WTF Art History

For everyone interested in art history who has asked, WTF?

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  1. The Temptation of Saint Anthony:

    Hieronymus Bosch, c. 1485, Museo del Prado

    Matthias Grünewald, Isenheim Altarpiece, 1512-16, Unterlinden Museum, Colmar, Alsace, France

    Lieven van Lathem, 1469, about 1471, and about 1480 - 1490, The J. Paul Getty Museum (Ms. 37), Los Angeles

    Joachim Patinir and Quinten Metsys, c. 1520-1524, Museo del Prado, Madrid

    Pieter Huys, 1547, Louvre Museum, Paris

    Giovanni Tiepolo, 17th century, Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan,

    Alessandro Magnasco, 1710-1720, Louvre Museum, Paris

    Max Ernst, 1945, © 2007 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

     
     
  2. thegetty:

    A peek beneath the skin. Anatomy for your Thursday. 

    Tabvla libri IIII. from Vivae imagines partivm corporis hvmani aereis formis expressae, 1566, Frans Huys, Pierre Huys and Andreas Vesalius. Getty Research Institute.
    Votive Statuette
    , 4th century B.C., Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.
    Surgical anatomy
    , 1851, Joseph Maclise. Getty Research Institute.
    Male figure with skin removed
    from Vivae imagines partivm corporis hvmani aereis formis expressae, 1566, Andreas Vesalius. Getty Research Institute.

     
     
  3. museumuesum:

Doug Aitken

last blast, 2008
neon lit lightbox, 82 x 110 1/2 x 11 inches

    museumuesum:

    Doug Aitken

    last blast, 2008

    neon lit lightbox, 82 x 110 1/2 x 11 inches

     
     
  4. thegetty:

A new tumblr from artist Becca Lofchie invites you to remake, take issue with, and generally riff on chivalry for the postmodern age.
Lo! Let the critiquing and revamping begin: The Chivalry Project

    thegetty:

    A new tumblr from artist Becca Lofchie invites you to remake, take issue with, and generally riff on chivalry for the postmodern age.

    Lo! Let the critiquing and revamping begin: The Chivalry Project

     
     
  5. Thunder Mountain Indian Monument, built by Chief Rolling Mountain Thunder and assistants, 1968-1983, Imlay, Nevada

    This eco-art architectural complex was built as a monument to the suffering and plight of American Indians at the hands of “white invaders,” as the landmark’s informational panels explain. About two hundred sculptures of Indians from all tribes and of all ages and status adorn the buildings; everything was made from concrete and discarded “white man’s junk” as a comment on the Indian genocide and world pollution. One encounters railroad ties, typewriters, cars and parts, highway barriers, dolls, license plates, and glass bottles, among countless other items. In 1983, several of the buildings were destroyed or damaged due to arson, thus today one sees only a remnant of the hostel, Indian school, cabins, workshop, bathhouse, and sweat house that once completed the site. Still visible as prominent landmarks along highway 80 are the monument and the chicken and round houses.

    A curious and overlooked work of art that is well worth a visit and extended contemplation, regardless of one’s views or ideas about history.

     
     
  6. Turone di Maxio, Polyptych with the Trinity and the Coronation of the Virgin, 1360. Museo di Castelvecchio, Verona

     
     
  7. Michelangelo’s David (copy) staring down Colossal Statue of Emperor Constantine at the Musei Capitolini, Rome

    Michelangelo’s David (copy) staring down Colossal Statue of Emperor Constantine at the Musei Capitolini, Rome

     
     
  8. Benjamin Falk, Eugen Sandow as the Dying Gaul, 1894.

From Wikipedia:
Eugen Sandow, often considered the first modern-day bodybuilder, was an admirer of the human physique, and in addition to strongman sideshows, he performed “muscle displays” by posing in the nude — save for a fig leaf that he would don in imitation of statues he had seen in Italy as a boy.

    Benjamin Falk, Eugen Sandow as the Dying Gaul, 1894.

    From Wikipedia:
    Eugen Sandow, often considered the first modern-day bodybuilder, was an admirer of the human physique, and in addition to strongman sideshows, he performed “muscle displays” by posing in the nude — save for a fig leaf that he would don in imitation of statues he had seen in Italy as a boy.

     
     
  9. fauvismluvr98:

John Baldessari

    fauvismluvr98:

    John Baldessari

    (Source: ellsworthsmelly)

     
     
  10. Front & Back: Maestro di Staffolo, Madonna of Mercy and Saints John the Baptist and Sebastian, mid-15thC, Palazzo Venezia, Rome